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Farming

in Blog, Farming, Geese, Livestock, Poultry, Waterfowl

Eating Cotton Patch Geese

 “OK, if this freaks anyone out, just say so, but we had the most awesome dinner tonight. Goose.” A friend of mine who owns babies and grand babies of our Tom Walker line of geese just posted this on facebook. To me, this is excellent news.  Now I know some of you are vegetarians/vegans or meat eaters who pretend that meat wasn’t once a live animal, so stop reading now if you don’t want to hear a review of how this amazing bird tastes.  As for me, I’m getting hungry… She continues: I can not believe how good these are….

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in Blog, Farming, Gardening

All about Peas

Peas are among the first veggies you plant in the spring. Most cool-season annuals can be sown or transplanted through early May, allowing them sufficient time to reach maturity and be harvested before the excessive heat hits. The last frost dates here are April 3 (50%) and May 2 (90%.) So one year in two there’s a frost later than April 3; and one year in ten a frost later than May 2. Locals think of April 15 as the “average” last-frost date; that’s when they feel confident about setting out tender plants, realizing protection may still be needed. The…

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in Blog, Farming, Gardening

Three Sisters Garden

The ancient Native American technique of growing Corn, Beans, and Squash together in an arrangement called the Three Sisters is the ultimate in companion planting and helps increase harvests, naturally! Corn acts as a support for climbing bean vines, the beans fix nitrogen in the soil for the high feeding requirements of corn and squash, and the squash provides mulch and root protection for the corn and beans! After cooperating beautifully in the garden, corn and beans form a complete protein when eaten together! How’s that for a mutually beneficial relationship? The Three Sisters are all easy to direct sow in the garden and are a great project for children, teaching…

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in Blog, Farming, Gardening

What should I plant in March in my High Desert garden?

For High Desert planters, this is what I suggest: Bean, bush Bean, lima beet, Cantaloupe, Carrot, Chard, sweet corn, Cucumber, leaf lettuce, spring peas, Pepper, Irish seed potato, Radish, Rhubarb, Rutabaga, Spinach, Summer squash, Tomato plant, Turnip, Watermelon Some of these might need some protection if a frost hits so pay attention!  This would include squash, tomatoes, peppers and melons.  The rest should do fine with bad weather for the most part.  Some straw wouldn’t hurt and neither would some plastic, or a milk jug. March Bean, bush Bean, lima beet Cantaloupe Carrot Chard Corn, sweet Cucumber leaf lettuce Pea,…

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in Blog, Farming, Gardening

Transplanting cucumbers and green beans

Ok, I have a question. This is the first time I have started seeds indoors. We planted in egg cartons. It’s been a week and the green beans and cucumbers are huge. How long can they stay in the egg cartons? I had no idea how fast they’d grow and thought I’d just go from the egg cartons to the ground in a few weeks. Now, it’s looking like I’ll have to transplant. What do you think? I’d direct seed the green beans for sure and don’t usually transplant cukes. They don’t like to be transplanted, but transplant ok as…

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in Blog, Chickens, Farming, Livestock, Poultry

Dog Attack (Graphic…sort of)

There was snow on the ground today and I was so happy.  But then I got out to the chicken coop.  There were dead chickens everywhere.  Dogs had got in, even after we chickenwired the bottom of the fence to keep everyone safe.  They decimated our Dorking flock.  After all these years of working to breed chickens touch enough to withstand the desert extremes and to build a flock big enough to really start selling chicks… To say that I’m discouraged is an understatement.  I was already discouraged because we’re having such a hard time dealing with permitting issues for…

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in Blog, Chickens, Farming, Livestock, Poultry

New Dorking Chicks

Our first dorkings of the year are chirping merrily away in their brooder.  Almost all of them hatched on their own with absolutely no help which is the way I like it.  About five chicks needed help.  These stragglers took so long to get out of their eggs that the egg membrane died and stuck to them making it impossible for them to move. Dorking stragglers It’s very easy to help a chick hatch.  You just gently break the egg shell and remove it bit by bit.  I put warm water on the dried membrane and rub it until it…

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in Blog, Bloodhounds, Farming

Existential Farming

Farming is very existential. Today, we put down one of our bloodhounds and we welcomed 60 new baby chickens into the world.  Yes farming is very existential. Existentialism is the idea that there are inescapable elements of human existence such as isolation, powerlessness, responsibility and death.  These realities are things that we don’t want to face.  We ignore the realities, lose ourselves in activities that make us forget reality and do whatever it takes to defend ourselves from acknowledging the truths of existence.  Many of the issues people face are due to existential truths rather than what we therapists call…

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in Blog, Farming, Gardening, Natural Health

I supported Monsanto

I had no idea.  I swear.  I thought I was supporting small farmers and heritage plants, but I was tricked into supporting Monsanto.  I recently purchased onion sets from Dixondale farms and I actually planted them today.  Yes, I planted things in my precious soil that put money in the pocket of Monsanto.  I’m considering whether I should rip them all up and send them back for a refund… How did I get tricked?  It turns out that Monsanto has purchased a whopping 40% of the entire seed market by purchasing the company Seminis.  This was back in 2005, but most of…

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