Why should you learn to farm?  First let’s define farming.  When most people think of a farm, they envision thousands of acres of corn or wheat.  Even a small farmer with 50 acres is big in the typical people’s minds.  But there are also micro farmers which basically means tiny farmer.

We believe that anyone who raises their own food is a farmer.  If you are growing a Basil on your kitchen counter or if you have a couple hens in your backyard, you are micro farming.  You are becoming self-sufficient.  Our definition of a farmer also includes a homesteader.  Homesteaders are people who live a lifestyle of self-sufficiency.  They grow food to feed themselves and usually try to create other products for themselves such as soap.

Use of the term homesteader in the US dates back to the Homestead Act  of 1862

Homesteaders are still farmers.  Generally, they do what is called subsistence farming.  Subsistence farming is growing just enough food for your family to live off of.  It doesn’t include selling products, although it’s not unusual for subsistence farmers to sell a little in an overabundant season.

Farming of all scales has numerous benefits (not the least of which is increasing your chances of surviving the zombie apocalypse or any other doomsday scenario).  Farming decreases your food bill.  Farming provides jobs and potential income.  Farming gives you a sense of pride.  Farming is the foundation of a healthy democracy as it creates strong-willed, self-sufficient individuals who maintain a sense of community (you can’t farm by yourself).  Farming creates a healthy interdependence on each other with many farm jobs that require you to call up another farmer for help or advice.  Farming creates peace of mind.  Farming creates stability.

Farming builds family and chases away those who won’t work

 

There are as many reasons for farming as there are farmers.  Why do you want to learn how to farm?